THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

50 years ago a young, earnest, fresh-faced post-doc arrived in Manchester for an interview. He had come from Cambridge where he had got a Ph.D. from the Department of Metallurgy working with T.P. Hoar on the corrosion of aluminium. His face dropped when he saw the University building it was an old cotton mill surrounded by back-to-back houses and cobbled streets. The mill was a temporary building and due to be demolished within 10 years. It leaked from the outside and leaked from the inside. This young man's name was Graham Wood. He was appointed to carry out his own research into the corrosion of aluminium but also to create a Masters course in corrosion science. Now this Masters course is 
50 years old and it's now Prof Graham Wood, F.R.S.

40 years ago John Dawson was working in the corrosion group in chemical engineering and his job was also twofold Firstly to pursue his own research but also to create the one week course in corrosion engineering biased towards the process industry. Indeed John is still teaching on this course.

30 years ago I was given a task of organising this short-course and this year we have changed its emphasis towards the oil and gas industry and we are convinced that this new venture will be equally successful. Details of this new course can be found on the University of Manchester, School 
of Materials website under "corrosion short course".
These courses have changed, developed and been modified during the years as science and technology have changed, but their continuing success is a clear indication of their relevance not only for today but for the future.
The old mill was never demolished. It still with us today; it is still leaky from the outside and still leaky from the inside and my office got flooded two weeks ago.

David Scantlebury
Professor of Corrosion Science and Engineering