Young Engineers Programme

The May meeting of the Young Engineers programme was held at the CB&I offices in London on the 16th May. The topic was coatings which was presented by David Mobbs and was warmly received by the enthusiastic audience. The presentation covered the high priority areas of coating including the requirement to qualify products to standards, the standards and what they mean, the testing methods required to achieve this qualification, and also looked at some case histories of coating applications good and bad.

Prior to the presentation the case study for the programme was presented to the delegates by Richard Carroll of Shell, who highlighted the importance of working together in the teams to deliver the required information as detailed in the document. In a change to previous years there will be only one case study for all the teams with each team giving a presentation in a competition to be delivered at the November ICorr London branch meeting.
This year the case study covers a number of areas in which the students are being trained including, materials, coatings, CP, failures, and the management of change. The mentors this year are John Boran, Rob Doggert and Chris Googan, and the teams will meet their mentors in the coming weeks to get started on the case study. A Linkedin page and drop box, have been set up for the teams to help them with this process.
The next meeting on Painting, Fire Protection and Linings will take place on the 29th June again being held at CB&I offices on London.

Again we would like to thank our hosts CB&I especially Sadegh Parvisi for organising the venue, our sponsors BP and our speakers, organising committee and delegates without whom we would not be able to stage this event.

Young Engineer Programme (YEP)

ICorr’s Young Engineer Programme once again broke new ground as it held its first ever meeting online in May, for the reveal of its 2020 case study.

The grand surroundings of the Royal Over-Seas League might have been replaced with the homespun comforts of participants’ living rooms, but the content of the meeting remained as topical as ever with Steve Paterson from Arbeadie Consultants Ltd presenting the 2020 case study for the seven participating groups.

Focusing on an onshore titanium pipe corrosion failure, Steve described a scenario where several leaks were experienced in the piping at an onshore glycol desalination plant that required further investigation, giving the participants plenty to think about ahead of presenting their findings in November.

As an experienced technical expert with a deep knowledge of subsea engineering and corrosion management systems, Steve’s puzzling scenario ensured that the 32 participating young engineers – representing 19 companies, each with a wide and interesting variety of specialist backgrounds – had plenty to discuss on the evening.

The young engineer’s broad set of specialities include mechanical and materials engineering, welding, materials and more. These were all put to the test when discussing the desalination plant, which is used to periodically remove the salts from mono-ethylene glycol, used for hydration and corrosion control in gas pipelines from three offshore fields.

With the help of a mentor assigned to assist each group, the young engineers were posed with problems at the end of the presentation. These included proposing root causes for the defect, how to perform a corrosion risk assessment to determine if the plant is safe to operate, suggesting alternative materials, and identifying what mitigation options could be applied to prolong the service life of this section of the desalination plant, among others.

The YEP has been running for a number of years and delivers a technical competency framework that’s consistent with the Institute of Corrosion’s professional standards, to help prepare graduates for entry into the industry with a broad range of knowledge. As well as providing an opportunity to network with likeminded professionals, the programme also offers participants a stepping stone into the industry, and is the first stage in achieving MICorr and CEng status.

In what might be the first of many online meetings, the evening ran according to schedule, although participants and guests had to make their own tea and coffee during the scheduled break. Prior to that though they were entertained by Tim Evans, Caroline Allanach and Danny Burkle who offered a reflection on their 2018 winning case study.

Caroline and Danny discussed how they approached the case study and the fantastic resulting prize of a trip to the 2019 NACE Conference in Nashville, while Tim provided a critical assessment of their reaction and solution to the failure that occurred.

The case study was concluded by a series of questions and answers, before Trevor Osborne from Deepwater Corrosion Services brought the first ever online YEP meeting to a close with a message of thanks. The participants will attend four more lectures before reconvening in November to present their case study.

Young ICorr joint meeting with IMechE Young Members

Young ICorr joint meeting with IMechE Young Members

Young ICorr held a joint meeting with the Greater London region IMechE Young members network on the 21st of November. The talk was held in the Council room of the IMechE on Birdcage walk followed by networking in a nearby hostelry. The evening brought together young engineers, professionals and students from across the country who are interested in corrosion, materials, metallurgy and welding. It was a great opportunity to meet like-minded peers from other industries and also provided many of the attendees enrolled on the 2020 Young Engineering Programme (YEP) to meet prior to the programme starting in January.

Guest speaker Roger Francis (RF Materials) gave a fascinating talk on “Corrosion Engineers (& Metallurgists) can save you money”. This covered a whirlwind tour of case studies from fertiliser production to deep sea diving, highlighting poor materials selection and the importance of working together to understand the operating environment for the mechanical equipment. Often mistakes are repeated without learning, emphasising the need to engage a corrosion engineer. Roger’s extensive knowledge on duplex and superduplex stainless steels, in conjunction with correct heat treatments, demonstrated how the corrosion problems could be solved, often with cost savings. He then emphasised the importance of corrosion engineers’ involvements in QA/QC activities to ensure the correct testing and support regimes were put in place at the procurement stage. The talk was very well received and definatly got people thinking about the importance of materials selection.

Sponsorship was kindly provided by the Institute of Corrosion and IMechE. To stay informed about future Young ICorr events please join the LinkedIn group by searching for ‘Young ICorr’ or alternatively email Caroline.Allanach@gmail.com