The Mary-Rose and the Dynamic Duo – Joint Meeting of the Institute of Corrosion, London Branch with the SCI London Group

The second annual Joint Meeting of the Institute of Corrosion, London Branch with the SCI London Group was recently held at their prestigious headquarters in Belgravia Square. This ultra-modern auditorium made for a most comfortable setting and was enjoyed by an attendance of over 60. In the previous two days, eight health-related apologies had been received with many more from younger members on holidays with their children, as this was half-term week.

The Evening Chairman, John T O’Shea, a Past President of ICorr, began the evening procedures by thanking Dr Fred Parrett, currently Hon. Treasurer of the SCI London Section, for all his work in helping to organise this event. This was an excellent venue and was just around the corner from the Star Pub.

John T O’Shea, a Past President of ICorr, open the meeting

There were two separate presentations – “A Fighting Ship” and “Fighting Corrosion”.

The first presentation “A Fighting Ship” was based around the Mary-Rose project at Portsmouth. This was given by Professor Eleanor Schofield, Head of Conservation and Collections Care at the Mary Rose Trust. Eleanor graduated from Imperial College, where she also received her PhD in Material Science. She has recently received an Honorary Chair at the University of Kent, at Canterbury.

Whilst we are all familiar with the story of the recovery of the Mary Rose in 1982, Professor Schofield began her talk by correcting the too often quoted story that she sank in 1545 on her maiden voyage. In fact she was built in 1510 and served for 34 years as the flagship of Henry VIII’s navy in many battles particularly in wars against France.

Professor Eleanor Schofield giving presentation on “Fighting Ship”

Following the lifting of the ship out of the seabed mud, to prevent further deterioration once exposed to air, the timber hull was treated over many years by spraying with water and polyethylene glycol. Perhaps less well known is the work in restoring and maintaining over 19,000 artefacts that had also been recovered. A significant part of the collection were the 1200 plus iron cannonballs. These have been exposed to sea-water since the ship sank, and the chlorine in sea-water which is very damaging to iron when later exposed to air. This corrosion can eat away at the metal and weakening its structure. It was vital that ways were found of preserving the cannonballs. It was recognised that while the cannons were made to last and be used many times, the cannonballs were only needed for a one-off use. Thus they were greatly inferior in their quality and standards of manufacture.

Initially researchers attempted to remove chlorine from the cannonballs, by soaking in water with and without chemical treatment. Chlorine reduction by heating in an atmosphere of hydrogen was also attempted. Unfortunately, this did not successfully prevent disintegration when they were later put on display. To better understand this, Professor Schofield, established a research project with UCL Archaeology and the UK Diamond Light Source, to understand what was going on inside the cannonballs.

Diamond Light Source in Didcot is the UK’s national synchrotron. It works like a giant microscope, harnessing the power of electrons to produce penetrating bright light that scientists can use to study anything from fossils, to jet engines, to viruses and vaccines.

Diamond’s bright light X-rays combined with absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence mapping made it possible to visualise the differences in the corrosion profiles. These could be traced to the treatments applied in the 35 years since the cannon balls were recovered with the Mary Rose. The results of the bright X-rays have revealed detailed maps of the elements involved in the corrosive process, an unprecedented insight into conservation on a molecular scale. This crucial information will help protect this and other cultural heritage artefacts for many decades to come.

The second presentation, “Fighting Corrosion” was given by Jim Glynn, a previous Chairman of London Branch and currently the Hon Treasurer. He also runs his own business, Beanny, which is a Coating Distribution Company.

Jim Glynn delivering a presentation on Fighting Corrosion

In his introduction to this presentation, John reminded the audience that the Annual Award of the U R Evans Prize included the presentation of a full-size Sheffield Steel sword, while the H G Cole Award was a mounted poniard (a large dagger). These weapons represent the continued fight against corrosion.

Jim concentrated on the Dynamic Duo, starting with a suitable protective coating as the primary source of defence against corrosion. This should then be supported, where appropriate by a cathodic protection system to prevent any corrosion occurring at holidays or in areas of coating damage. This applies to in-ground and sub-sea structures.

It is often commonly conceived that rusting is a simple, chemical oxidation reaction – but it is not. Aqueous corrosion is however, a complex, multi-stage step process which includes electron transfer at the molecular level. Thus these Electro-Chemical operations during corrosion can be influenced by the external application of electrical potentials. Under the right circumstances, corrosion can be stopped by applying the appropriate level of negative potential using a DC current supply.

Jim presented many examples where the correct conditions of a good coating and a suitable working cathodic potential were present. However, he also described many examples where this was unsuccessful. These included a pipeline coating that had totally disbonded and broken away from the pipeline. This was due to a higher potential than required, which generated hydrogen gas on the surface of the pipeline, causing the damage.

He also described Thermally Sprayed Aluminium (TSA) applications, which are excellent protective coatings when properly applied. The aluminium content can also act as its own in-built cathodic protection anode. However, in the wrong environment, the aluminium can be quickly used up.

Jim expanded his presentation to compare the recent Case Studies of retro-fitting remote anode beds to two similar North Sea rigs. These rigs had exceeded their design life, but it was decided that the sub-sea structure could be further protected using cathodic protection. One had been fully coated with coal tar epoxy, while the legs on the other had been left bare, but with a built-in corrosion factor that should exceed its expected life. The survey confirmed that both could be successfully protected using the methods adopted in the much deeper waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

The coated structure required 1,000 Amps, while the bare steel legs needed around 7,500 Amps to produce the correct comprehensive negative potentials. The location of the anode sea-beds were also calculated. These high DC currents were produced by banks of adjustable transformer rectifiers (TRs) connected to an AC mains electrical source.

Jim also interspersed a number of quiz questions, asking the audience to identify some notable Dynamic Duos in life, film and comic books with several bottles of wine as prizes! This was well received and considered a fun way to conclude the presentations.

The Vote of Thanks was given by Dr Parrett and he presented the speakers with ICorr Engraved Cross pens, as a memento of the evening.

 John T O’Shea, Jim Glynn, Professor Eleanor Schofield and Dr Parrett 

 

 

 

 

 

ICorr 2018 AGM Meeting in conjunction with a half day Midlands Branch meeting and presentation of the 2018 U.R. Evans Award.

Dear Member,

The Trustees and Council of the Institute would like to invite you all to the 2018AGM to be held on Thursday 29th November 2018 at the Council Chambers Birmingham in conjunction with a half day Midlands Branch meeting and presentation of the 2018 U.R. Evans Award.

Midland Branch Meeting

13:00 – 13:30 Lunch served

13:30 – 13:40 Welcome and introductions

13:40 – 15:30 Presentations by industry experts

15.30 to 15.45 Coffee break

15.45 – 16.30 U.R. Evans Award:

Presentation of the U.R. Evans Award to Professor Anne Neville, followed by her Plenary lecture.

16:30 – 17:30 ICorr AGM

AGM Agenda

1          Apologies for absence

2          Minutes of the previous AGM November 2017

3          President’s report

4          Treasurer’s report

5          Elections

7          Any other business

The Trustees and members of Council will be available before the meeting to answer any questions you may have regarding the Institute and its future.

Again as in the case of 2017 the Institute’s accounts, and the minutes for the November 2017 AGM, will be available via the ICorr website (www.icorr.org).  Please examine them and the website in general as we would appreciate your feedback. The website will continue to be influential in increasing the Professional Membership and the perspective of non-members of ICorr and as a major means of communication with membership.

Your confirmation of attendance (for lunch numbers) or apology for absence will be appreciated preferably by e-mail to admin@icorr.org

We look forward to seeing you there.

Yours faithfully,

Dr Jane Lomas

Institute of Corrosion

Honorary Secretary

Click link below for copy of the invite:

AGM invite Letter 2018C

ICORR North East – Corrosion Under Insulation – Review of Coatings Test Standards NACE TG516 and ISO 19277

Image Source: https://www.eddyfi.com/oil-gas/corrosion-under-insulation-plague-what-you-need-to-know/

Welcome and please join us for a review of test methods NACE TG516 and ISO 19277.

Please follow this LINK to register for free tickets.

The meeting will take place at the Rosen Group starting at 6pm for networking followed by a presentation / discussion at 6.30pm delivered by Neil Wilds, a thought leader in coatings for corrosion under insulation.

Neil has 32yrs experience in Coatings Industry working on high solids epoxy’s / testing and CUI/Insulation Coatings. Currently Technical Marketing Manager for Sherwin Williams and a committee member on TG516 Standard Practice for Evaluating Protective Coatings for Use Under Insulation.

Presentation Overview:

There has been many iterations of test methods from coatings companies over the last 10-15 yrs looking at prequalification of CUI coatings. To a large extent this has not been standardised and accepted by the major Oil & Gas end users. Therefore over the last 3-4 years two CUI test method/prequalification standards have been worked on to solve this issue. This presentation will go through these tests methods and will hopefully

Reducing the Impact of Corrosion in Construction via Lean based Process Innovation

Event Description

Recent infrastructure failures such as Genoa Bridge collapse, which killed 43 people and caused major disruption, highlights the need for effective corrosion monitoring and protection and to embrace good corrosion maintenance processes as an integral part of asset construction and maintenance. Corrosion protection is valuable in preventing unplanned production stoppages or safety risks as a result of asset performance reduction. Assets such as bridges, platforms and critical physical infrastructure require corrosion protection and monitoring as an integral part of the maintenance programme throughout the life of the asset.

University of Salford will be hosting this event at its Media City Campus. Events bring together experts in Lean Construction, Process Innovation and Corrosion specialists. The key focus is to raise awareness among Supply Chain contractors of the importance Corrosion Protection for the whole life cost of assets, as well as develop an understanding about their requirements, with a view to reduce defects and reworks, which often results in delays, cost overruns and increased  H&S risks for the project. Panel discussion and group exercises will focus on use of innovative strategies to involve specialist sub-contractors’ expertise in early design and planning stages, using lean principles as a framework to integrate entire supply chain.

Date:                 Thursday 8th Nov, 2018

Time:                 9:30am – 4:00pm 

Location:          Room 0.11 Media City Campus (Next to BBC studios), Salford Quays, University of Salford, Salford M50 2HE,

Agenda

9:30 – 10:00 Continental Breakfast and Networking
10:00 – 10:10 Welcome & Event Introduction Dr. Zeeshan Aziz, University of Salford
10:10 – 10:25 Understanding the Importance of Corrosion Protection for the whole life cost of assets Lucia Fullalove,

BSc, MSc, FICorr – Fullalove & Associates

10:25 – 10:40 The effects of Corrosion from a maintenance engineer point of view Jutinder Birdi BSc(Hons), CEng, MICE, MIStructE , Arcadis – Technical Director –  Bridges & Civil Structures
10:40 – 10:55 National Sector Scheme 19A – A chairman point of view David Horrocks, MICorr – Materials Engineer –

BAM Nuttall Ltd

10:55- 11:00 Lean from the Clients perspective Stephen Greenhalgh,

Lean Specialist,

Highways England

11:00 – 11:20 Tea Break
11:20 – 12:00 Cathodic Protection in Civil Construction – getting lean Dr Chris Atkins,

Mott MacDonald

12:00 – 13:10 Panel discussion –

Role of Lean in addressing corrosion defects: causes, consequences and costs

All
13:10 – 14:00 Lunch Break
14:00 – 15:30 Group Exercise – Development of Project Proposals to Enhance Lean & Corrosion Integration All
15:30 – 15:50 Group Exercises – Debrief Sessions and next steps All
15:50 – 16:00 Way forward and Concluding Remarks

 

 

Event is free to attend however, registration is required. Please register by clicking here.