Aberdeen Branch – Opening Events 2019/2020 on MIC – Microbiologically Induced Corrosion & Annual Corrosion Awareness Day

The New Aberdeen Chair Stephen Tate welcomed attendees to its Annual Corrosion Awareness Event 

The Aberdeen Branch opened its 2019-2020 session on 27/08/2019, with 2 linked events on MIC – Microbiologically Induced Corrosion.

Its well-attended Annual Corrosion Awareness Day (CAD) had a full day teaching programme on MIC Risks, Mitigations, Modelling and Bacterial Analysis, complimented by an evening visit the following week, to NCIMB Laboratories in Bucksburn and the National Collection of Industrial, Food and Marine Bacteria.

The CAD Event featured some excellent talks by ICR – Dr Carol Devine, the DTI – Danish Technological Institute – Dr Laura Tiano and Dr Lone Tang, from Shell – Mabel Ntim and from Key Sponsor ROSEN – Dr Ian Laing, Dr Daniel Sandana and Steven Loftus, (CAD Co-ordinator).

Dr Carol Devine opened the Teaching Programme with a fascinating insight into her career as a Microbiologist entitled “My Life in MIC”

Microbiologically influenced corrosion can have a major impact on operators’ CAPEX, OPEX and cause severe environmental damage.

A key aim of the CAD Workshop was therefore to improve understanding of complex MIC processes, detection of microbiological activity in Pipeline systems and management of MIC in the Pipeline Industry in particular, which has seen many Pipelines lost due to Internal Corrosion in the North Sea Sector.

Many Analytical techniques were discussed in detail, including qPCR (molecular) analysis, traditional culture based MPN (most probable number), NGS, (next-generation sequencing which has revolutionized biological sciences), Metagenomics, (the study of genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples), along with Pipeline In-Line Inspection Tools, (deploying a wide range of NDT methods), Internal Cleaning, Chemical Treatment and MIC Modelling Tools for corrosion rate determination.

A lively discussion followed with many valuable viewpoints expressed and with great inputs from the 4 participating Microbiologists.

It was emphasized to all CAD delegates, the need for an integrated approach to microbial monitoring,  combining data from multiple techniques, together with taking a fully holistic approach to Pipeline Integrity Management.

Dr Ian Laing, Principal Corrosion Engineer of ROSEN discussed MIC Modelling / MIC Management and the vast range of specialist tools available for Cleaning and Intelligent Pigging

Advanced Intelligent Pigging and Cleaning Tools on Display from ROSEN – Key Event Sponsor

The NCIMB Event of 03/09/19, built on the previously weeks discussions, with a most informative Event led by Dr Daniel Swan who was previously Head of Platforms and Pipelines, (now the Genomics Pipelines Group) at the Earlham Institute in Norwich, (formerly The Genome Analysis Centre – TGAC).

NCIMB have 68 year’s experience of preserving, storing, distributing, analysing and exploiting micro-organisms and are the only privately owned, publicly viewable collection of bacteria in the UK.

A very comprehensive tour of the NCIMB Laboratories followed Daniel’s presentation and recommendations for effective Bacterial Monitoring Strategies, with everyone kitted out in protective clothing to view a wide range of practical demonstrations of Bacterial Sampling. Archiving and Determination.

 

Kyle Sim (Laboratory Assistant) of NCIMB explains the MPN Bacterial Sampling, Serial Dilution and Bacterial Counts to ICorr Attendees

A peek inside the NCIMB Vault – National Collection of Industrial Food and Marine Bacteria: with Samantha Law (Culture Collection Curator)

An example of collaboration between different Bacterial Data Sources and Counts that provides a more effective summary of Bacterial Contamination Status, (by Dr Daniel Swan).

The NCIMB Laboratories Team from L to R, Michelle Robertson (Analytical Services Manager), Dr Carol Phillips (CEO), Sheila Batchelor (Marketing Manager), Vikki Mitchell (Identification Services Manager), Julie Mackinnon (Senior Molecular Scientist), Maggie Bayliss (Inbound Sales Exec), Kyle Sim (Laboratory Assistant) and Dr Daniel Swan (NGS Services Manager)

 

This most interesting Industrial Visit to NCIMB, (the first of 2 in the 2019-2020 programme), generated very many questions, so many in fact the Event overran by nearly 90 minutes !

At the close of both Meetings, the new Aberdeen Chair, Mr Stephen Tate presented all speakers and organisers with Certificates of Appreciation from the Branch.

Looking ahead, the ICorr Aberdeen Branch will be hosting its annual joint event with TWI – The Welding Institute on 24/09/19 at RGU, which will discuss in detail Environmentally Related Cracking. This talk will cover the topic of SCC on Offshore assets with emphasis on Weldments and HISC issues.

Full details of future ICorr Aberdeen events can be found on the diary page of the magazine and on the website, or by contacting: ICorrABZ@gmail.com

Further photos of both Events may be found on the Aberdeen Branch Gallery:

CAD Event – 27/08/19

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMGp8-SMQdQLin4PLfJVr0W0NrveB7FxS94-zQUfKUUw9fXi4jZmnk-YgS9iLdl8Q?key=djdtYTdQVEZNZ2RyT3drMzdHVlBmbTZYbzhyOTR3

Industrial Visit – 03/09/19

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipNtC4h-MzlZ8OwwBB-kOgj8U7THZDcPFkL-k2w7TcIUM_CEK26uGscDqnB9TBvlZA?key=YVRfLV8tNjFTOHFFaTJZbTE3ZjdIREdqSTdXeDN3

Aberdeen Branch News

Aberdeen Branch News

The branch have secured continued commitments from all their existing 2018/2019 members and in addition have elected a new committee member, Mr. Jonathan Segynola (Corrosion Technical Authority of CNR)
At the AGM held on 28th May 2019, Stephen Tate and Nigel Owen, were elected Chair and Vice Chair respectively for the 20198/2020 session.
The successful May technical event was jointly organised between ICorr and NACE, and had 49 enthusiastic attendees from across industry and 3 very knowledgeable speakers.
Scott Maidman – Global Deployment Manager of Air Liquide, commenced proceedings with a detailed talk on the merits of Dry Ice Blast Cleaning, as an alternative method of surface preparation. This technique has been designed specifically for use in fabric maintenance in the Oil and Gas industry and similar applications, offering an alternative means of surface preparation and removal of coatings and corrosion. Further development of the equipment has allowed surface profiling through the addition of common abrasives to the dry ice flow. Its additional benefits include a reduced carbon footprint, less waste and post-blast clean up, when compared to other commonly used methods.
Graeme Kennedy – Manager Oil & Gas Downstream UK & Ireland for International Paint, continued with a complimentary talk on Cyclic Corrosion Testing on Surfaces that have been prepared by Dry Ice Blasting. International Paint collaborated with Dry Ice Global and NACE Aberdeen section to investigate the comparative performance of surface tolerant coatings systems when applied to corroded steel surfaces prepared by Dry Ice Blasting, with injected garnet abrasive. International Paint provided pre-rusted carbon steel panels which were blast cleaned and coated with two proprietary coatings systems and then allowed to cure prior to testing. These coated panels were then exposed to ISO12944-9: 2018 (formerly ISO20340 Performance requirements for protective paint systems for offshore and related structures) cyclic corrosion testing, as used in NORSOK M501, Edition 6. The coated panels were all scribed to expose the metal surface and tested for 25 cycles /4200 hours /6 months of alternate UV/condensation, salt spray and freeze to -20°C. The presentation considered the performance of common surface tolerant coatings systems applied over this method of surface preparation, and assessed the corrosion creep from the scribe, and adhesion values, as an indication of performance in the field.

Kennedy of International Paint, in an informative presentation entitled - Cyclic Corrosion Testing on Surfaces Prepared by Dry Ice Blasting.

Kennedy of International Paint, in an informative presentation entitled – Cyclic Corrosion Testing on Surfaces Prepared by Dry Ice Blasting.

Out-going chair Dr Yunnan Gao presents Certificates of Appreciation to the event Speakers - Simon Daly, Scott Maidman, and Graeme Kennedy.

Out-going chair Dr Yunnan Gao presents Certificates of Appreciation to the event Speakers – Simon Daly, Scott Maidman, and Graeme Kennedy.

Simon Daly – Oil & Gas Segment Manager, Hempel A/S, rounded off a very informative evening with a final presentation entitled ‘Evaluating the Effect of Surface Preparation Standard on Zinc Rich Epoxy Primers’. The presentation focussed on work carried out over an 18 month period with a view to creating consistent reproducible test panels for use in the evaluation of protective coating systems for corrosive environments. Additionally he presented a draft evaluation methodology for combining coating’s application characteristics and long term performance. Simon explained that historically, zinc rich primers have been associated with use as a primary means of corrosion protection on offshore assets at the new construction stage. His presentation investigated the risks and benefits of adopting zinc rich epoxy technology for the far more demanding maintenance phase, by considering/comparing different zinc systems under a variety of sub optimal surface preparation conditions, and the impact upon performance, the effect of the number of coating layers and coating type on system tolerance to salt contamination, 
a suitable means of providing consistently prepared test panels to recognized standards, other than commonly applied SA 2.5, and a test methodology for ensuring consistent levels of 
salt contamination prior to application and evaluation of 
coating performance.
This most interesting series of presentations generated many questions and proposals for future testing programmes.
The branch have secured a continued agreement from the Robert Gordon University (RGU) for use of their main Lecture Theatre (N242), as its venue the 2019/2020 evening events free of charge, and an excellent programme has now been compiled, which will be featured on the Institute website and circulated to all branch sponsors and companion institutes.
Looking ahead, the branch will be hosting its annual full-day Corrosion Awareness (CAD) course on 27th August 2019, (via key sponsor Rosen UK, at the Palm Court hotel), comprising of a number of lectures / presentations focusing on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in pipeline systems. This year’s CAD programme will include talks by ROSEN specialists and other visiting speakers, on their MIC experiences from global operations covering – Sampling, Analysis, Monitoring of Pipelines for MIC damage, Chemical Mitigation / Cleaning Strategies and finally Inspection, Modelling and Monitoring approaches. Most certainly this event will provide a very comprehensive introduction, to this very significant and often troublesome area of Corrosion Control / Prevention.
Finally, It is with deep sadness that the Aberdeen committee have to report the loss of Alan Foxton, a past ICorr and TWI presenter, and Richard Waud, a valued and regular ICorr attendee, on the 9th and 10th July respectively. Our thoughts are with all their families, friends and colleagues.
As usual, full details of future branch events can be found on the diary page of the magazine and on the website, or by contacting: ICorrABZ@gmail.com

Industrial event at ICR, Bridge of Don for Aberdeen Branch

Industrial event at ICR, Bridge of Don for Aberdeen Branch

The March meeting was an industrial event at ICR, Bridge of Don, with group presentations and demonstrations of three of ICR’s core business activities.

ICR have specialised tooling and trained engineers, who deal with the insertion and retrieval of corrosion monitoring coupons in live pipeline valve stations (Online Retrievals).
Pre-installed fittings on the pipes allow threaded plugs which carry the mounted coupons to be inserted into the pipe.
This is carried out using either mechanical or hydraulic, telescopic portable tooling which can introduce, through the valve gate, fresh coupons of prepared carbon steel which then sit within the line for the study period.  Recovery of the coupons allows for weight loss assessment and corrosion pattern studies, which can be used to evaluate the corrosive nature of the fluid and help to provide remedial measures, such as chemical injection solutions.

ICR also offers on-site weldless, flange to pipe connections which are carried out using a hydraulic colleted + ram system. The flanges to be fitted to the pipe have an annular groove in the inside into which the wall of the pipe can be expanded using tooling inserted inside the pipe end. The hydraulic ram contains a split collet which expands inside the pipe and forces a ring of the pipe wall into the flange grove. This provides a weldless metal to metal gas tight seal which is dressed each end with sealant to prevent water ingress to the junction. This can be performed on pipe to flange connections in any remote situation with 3” to 15” pipes.

A full demonstration of the operation was performed on 10” pipe using the hydraulic compressor and ram, and sectioned flanges were offered to the audience as proof of the integrity and bond.

Finally, a presentation was made on engineering repair solutions for pipe work and structural beam strengthening.  These composite repairs use glass and carbon fibre cloth which is soaked in epoxy and then systematically wrapped around surface-prepared pipes, T-junctions elbows or structural beam sections, to cover and reinforce damaged or thinned areas of pipe or steelwork. The wrapping fibre used has a woven nature and anisotropic strength. Once wrapped, a compression bandage is added and within 24 hrs, the epoxy laden fibre will reach its full cured strength. The wrap system is ideal for situations were emergency or temporary repairs are required, but is often suitable for longer term fix until major maintenance programmes are permissible. ICR are also able to wrap pipes under service and low pressure which are leaking. A flanged threaded plate is fitted into the leak and a hose added to divert the leaking fluid while the pipe and edge of the plate are wrapped in the composite. Once the wrap has cured, the threaded plate can be fitted with a blanking plug to reseal the pipe.

At the close of the industrial visit, the Chairman, Dr Yunnan Gao, presented ICR with a certificate of appreciation.   Further industrial visits are planned for September 2019 (NCIMB Microbial Laboratories) and March 2020 (Oceaneering NDT).

The April event was the annual joint meeting with the MCF (Marine Corrosion Forum) where the branch were very
pleased to welcome Scaled Solutions Ltd of Edinburgh, to talk on their recent R&D findings into the performance and optimization of corrosion inhibitors, including those for demanding HP (12,000 psi) / HT (300 C) operations.

(The Scottish Government recently recognised Scaled Solutions’ contribution to Research and Development through the provision of a £2.2M grant award in June 2017, to support R&D in several key areas for the Oil and Gas Production industry. This award, together with significant further investment by Scaled Solutions themselves of £3M, should bring significant cost-saving and corrosion prevention benefits to O&G operations).

It is well known that during qualification of a corrosion inhibitor, it is extremely important to carry out laboratory-based assessments that are prudently representative. However in practice, there are many variables that can contribute to the corrosive nature of a system and it is often costly and time consuming to accurately reproduce all the different field conditions.   Because of this, investigations are normally carried out using an iterative screening programme, starting with simple tests, followed by product deselection and then further more complex tests.  The simplified screening tests then determine the preferred products and dose rates which can pass to the next stage of testing.  It is therefore vital that these initial screening tests are carried out in an appropriate a manner as possible.

Hunter Thomson explained how Scaled Solutions’ ongoing research into seemingly small changes to test methodologies and conditions in these preliminary screening tests, can significantly influence the outcome of screening studies.  A range of corrosion inhibitors based on common chemistries have been formulated by them to test these effects more precisely, and their extensive results to date have illustrated the controlling effect of aspects such as pre-corrosion, the impact of the brine chemistry, inhibitor composition, as well as the effectiveness of partitioning for different chemicals, on the performance and relative performance of different products. 

Hunter highlighted how relatively small changes in the methodology adopted, can lead to considerable differences in the observed performance, ranking, and outcome of the
pre-screening of corrosion inhibitor chemicals, and that thorough understanding and careful design of corrosion inhibitor screening programmes are essential to eliminating possible errors and test artefacts.

This most interesting presentation generated many questions and proposals for future work, covering topics such as effects of intermittent chemical injection, surface area and scaling.

At the close of the meeting, the chair presented Hunter Thomson with a certificate of appreciation.

Looking further ahead, the branch will be hosting its annual full-day Corrosion Awareness course on 27th August 2019, (via key sponsor Rosen), comprising of a number of lectures/presentations focusing on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in pipeline systems. This year’s programme will include talks by ROSEN specialists and other visiting speakers, on their MIC Experiences from global operations covering, sampling, analysis, monitoring of pipelines for mic damage, chemical mitigation / cleaning strategies, and finally inspection, modelling and monitoring approaches.

Most certainly this event will provide a very comprehensive introduction to this very significant and often troublesome area of Corrosion Control/Prevention, and the provisional programme can be found on the Institute website.

Full details of future ICorr Aberdeen events can be found on the diary page of the magazine and on the website, or by contacting: ICorrABZ@gmail.com, and all past branch presentations can also be found on: https://sites.google.com/site/icorrabz/resource-center

MCF and ICorr Delegates at April Joint Event.

Hunter Thompson of Scaled Solutions Ltd.

Aberdeen Branch

Aberdeen Branch

The branch was very fortunate to have some excellent speakers for its winter meetings at Robert Gordon University (RGU) which attracted good audiences.

Dr Ed Whyte, principal corrosion engineer, and Paul McCarthy, of Plant Integrity Management (PIM) commenced the Q1 2019 programme with some great insights into the concepts of Maximising Economic Recovery (MER). Ed’s role has encompassed the provision of corrosion and integrity engineering services to PIM’s clients, while Paul is currently involved in various maintenance and inspection optimisation projects for a range of North Sea Operators.

They discussed the historic barriers to MER and how a step change from 60-74% production efficiency has recently been achieved, highlighting that only a 1% increase in efficiency, can dramatically produce an extra 12 million barrels per year in the North Sea, as 2016 figures have demonstrated.

Dr Ed Whyte of Plant Integrity Management (PIM) discusses managing integrity issues v. MER.

Dr Ed Whyte of Plant Integrity Management (PIM) discusses managing integrity issues v. MER.

The initial UKCS Review (2013), the final Wood Report (2014) and new OGA (2015) UK MER Legislation (2018), have all recognised the importance of reducing UK plant 
downtime / lost production. The most high profile MER document being the Wood Review (https://www.ogauthority.co.uk/about-us/what-we-do/the-wood-review/)

Although there has been a continuing downward trend in the number of plant losses, there remains an ever growing demand to limit UK Oil / Gas production outages, so as to maximise what income is available.

Most importantly, the presenters explained how gains to production efficiency can be achieved by approaching integrity management in a very different manner than has been the case before, through taking a long-term (but modular) view, with improved collaboration and engagement, assisted in all this by modern IT tools and devices that control data and costs more effectively.
The McKinsey Global Institute (2017) has studied in detail the longer term economic impact of “short termism”, and industry’s reluctance to invest in larger / longer maintenance projects. McKinsey claim that this figure is as high as 87% of executives and directors that feel pressured to demonstrate strong financial performance within 2 years or less, thus limiting available anti-corrosion / preventative maintenance expenditure.

In line with the McKinsey findings, PIM proposed that large maintenance projects be broken into more manageable / more achievable smaller repair / intervention scopes that target just one specific area or system, under a single project manager. This approach was then explained in greater detail by looking at the specific needs of upcoming CUI / PFP / FM preventative maintenance programmes and how they could be accommodated within this new modular approach to minimise external corrosion risks.

The full text of this most interesting and informative presentation can be seen at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Y36lf6ApIE

The February meeting was billed as a special Coating / Linings event, with two very knowledgeable presenters, Ajith A Varghese from International Paint Ltd and Gary Carswell of AEGION Group of Companies, who gave most interesting talks on Corrosion under Insulation (CUI) preventative coatings and Anti-Microbial Pipeline Linings, respectively.

The well attended Special Coatings Event at RGU in February.

The well attended Special Coatings Event at RGU in February.

Firstly CUI, which is a major issue that causes great cost to industry, and is currently the subject of a major project by the Oil & Gas Technology Centre, Aberdeen (OGTC). CUI poses a significant operational, safety and economic challenge. This is magnified in the North Sea, where many of the assets and infrastructure are operating well beyond their expected design life, and the OGTC vision is to eliminate all corrosion failures due to CUI by 2026.

Ajith A Varghese from International Paint presents on alkylated amine epoxies.

Ajith A Varghese from International Paint presents on alkylated amine epoxies.

Ajith explained in great detail, the mechanisms of CUI, the integrity risks created, and the extensive research and development programmes undertaken in their Newcastle Laboratories. All prevailing ISO and NACE Standards, and their recent amendments, were discussed in the context of developing a new preventative product, and the lengthy but very necessary processes by which this is then taken to market, incorporating lessons learnt from field trials and customer feedback. In particular alkylated amine epoxies were discussed, which have been proven to have superior DFT cracking tolerance to over-application and increased productivity even at low temperatures, compared to standard epoxy phenolic systems.

Gary Carswell then explained in the context of internal corrosion prevention, how the use of protective pipeline liners has been very widely adopted by both the Energy and Non-Energy Sectors.
MIC related pipeline leaks typically account for 40% of all corrosion related failures, thus these compressive and rotational liner insertion processes can bring great advantages and enormous savings by extending the lives of water injection lines offshore and in many water distribution systems onshore. The 47km long Tweedsmuir offshore water injection lining was a prime example of this technology being put into practice for North Sea operations with sections pre-lined before laying.

This technology incorporates anti-microbial mitigation chemicals into the lining system that can then successfully prevent the growth and spread of MIC organisms. Typically a design life of 25yrs is specified for such lining systems but further R&D programmes are working towards a 50 year design life. In service failure of linings is extremely rare, provided adequate care is taken in respect of preparation and across pipeline joints.

Gary explained the many different lining types that protect against internal corrosion, their application systems and different geographical needs, in a very informative manner that was appreciated by all.

Both January and February talks generated many questions from the audience, which were well responded to by the speakers. The talks will be the subject of follow-up technical papers later in Corrosion Management.

Dr Yunnan Gao, the ICorr Aberdeen Chair, congratulated all speakers and presented them with Certificates of Appreciation.

Branch Chair Dr. Yunnan Gao presents a Certificate of Appreciation to Gary Carswell of Aegion.

Branch Chair Dr. Yunnan Gao presents a Certificate of Appreciation to Gary Carswell of Aegion.

The next technical evening, which will be run jointly with the Marine Corrosion Forum, will be held on Tuesday 30 April, when Dr. Ian Carpenter of Scaled Solutions, will present a talk on ‘Corrosion Inhibitor Screening: Impact of Test Approaches’ For the convenience of MCF conference attendees, this event will be held at ICorr’s old home, the Palm Court Hotel, starting at 5.30 pm.

Prior to this, a large range of papers will be presented by MCF commencing at 10.30 a.m, including:
• Oilfield reservoir souring; Forecasting of Microbiological sour gas production using the DYNAMICTVS© model, by Matt Streets of Rawwater Engineering.
• A comprehensive approach to Integrity assessment of Critical structural components operating in Marine environments with ASPIRE™ by Sebastian Hartmann, Payam Jamshidi, Innospection and TWI.
• CP inspection and monitoring of Subsea pipelines by Ross Fielding of Impalloy Ltd.

A full list of upcoming presentations can be found at https://www.marinecorrosionforum.org

Looking further ahead, the branch will be hosting its annual full-day Corrosion Awareness course on 27 August 2019, comprising of a number of lectures / presentations focusing on microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in pipeline systems. This year’s CAD programme will include talks by ROSEN specialists and other visiting speakers, on their MIC experiences from global operations covering – Sampling, Analysis, Monitoring of Pipelines for MIC damage, Chemical Mitigation / Cleaning Strategies and finally Inspection, Modelling and Monitoring approaches.

Most certainly this event will provide a very comprehensive introduction, to this very significant and often troublesome area of Corrosion Control / Prevention.

As usual, all branch presentations can be found on: https://sites.google.com/site/icorrabz/resource-center, and full details of future events can be found on the diary page of the magazine and on the website, or by contacting, ICorrABZ@gmail.com

Aberdeen Branch News

Aberdeen Branch News

The branch was very pleased to welcome retiring ICorr President Sarah Vasey on her farewell tour, to the committee Christmas dinner, which was held at the beginning of December. Sarah has taken a great interest in the work of the branch, as with other UK Branches that she has helped to develop during her Presidency.

L to R: Dr. Muhammad Ejaz, Amir Attarchi, Hooman Takhtechian, Dr. Nigel Owen, Sarah Vasey, Dr. Yunnan Gao, Zahra Lotfi, Bryn Roberts and Stephen Tate of the Aberdeen Branch Committee.

L to R: Dr. Muhammad Ejaz, Amir Attarchi, Hooman Takhtechian, Dr. Nigel Owen, Sarah Vasey, Dr. Yunnan Gao, Zahra Lotfi, Bryn Roberts and Stephen Tate of the Aberdeen Branch Committee.

At the November joint meeting with IOM3, Dr Ed Wade gave a presentation to an audience of over 50, on the subject of “Downhole Metallurgy and Corrosion – from the first pipe, to current challenges”, which proved a fascinating insight into the topic that had everyone glued to their seats.

Dr Wade originally trained as a metallurgist and his interest in downhole metallurgy developed during 13 years spent with Marathon Oil in Aberdeen and subsequently as an independent consultant. Since 2004, he has delivered more than 40 training courses focussed on the selection of corrosion resistant alloys for downhole applications, including ‘open’ courses promoted in Aberdeen by the Mining Institute of Scotland (a local affiliate society of IOM3).

Starting with the first use of downhole pipe, the talk progressed through subsequent developments that have remained central to current practice; recent novel HP/HT challenges were also outlined, before closing with an overview of future very challenging downhole requirements for Geothermal Energy and Carbon Storage, such as United Downs Deep Power Project in Cornwall, that will require many thousands of new deep / high performance wells to be drilled and operated under highly corrosive conditions.

It was a fascinating tour through 159 years of metallurgical advancement of tubular goods, commencing with the Drake Well in 1859, (that went on to operate for another 40 years), through to the development of modern API Specs and Coding Systems, trends and advances in North Sea CRA use for tubulars, together with an explanation of how corrosion mechanisms such as Ringworm have been eliminated through improved heat treatments.

The difficulties in adequately simulating and testing for all downhole situations was highlighted along with the sometimes intermittent, and sometimes unplanned operational practices of the Oil and Gas and other Industries, which place huge demands/expectations on material performance in sometimes rapidly changing conditions.
The need for materials to withstand highly corrosive sub-surface gases at very high partial pressures for extended periods, and the difficulties of successfully implementing preventative chemical treatments at immense depth were clearly explained.

It was also evident that composites have still yet to make huge in-roads into the market place f0r downhole use and to successfully compete with the available wide range of corrosion resistant metallics. The main problem here seems to be industry confidence in non-metallics, as being relatively new, difficult to manufacture, and not having well established test protocols for downhole scenarios.
The event generated many questions from the audience that were very well responded to by this distinguished speaker.

The branch 2018/19 session continues on 26 February, with a special coatings technical event. Ajith Varghese of International Paint will talk on ‘A Novel Approach to Combatting CUI’ and Michael Baraky (RMB Products) and Rob Mackie (United Pipeline Systems), will discuss ‘MIC-Resistant HDPE Linings for Seawater Applications’.

Branch Chair Dr. Yunnan Gao presents a Certificate of Appreciation to Presenter Dr Ed Wade of Metal Ecosse after the Event.

Branch Chair Dr. Yunnan Gao presents a Certificate of Appreciation to Presenter Dr Ed Wade of Metal Ecosse after the Event.

Dr Ed Wade’s paper can be found on: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N2CqylMutsUOjAj5ixPsFeHoRsr1gL1p/view?usp=drive_web and all past Aberdeen ICorr Presentations can be found on: https://sites.google.com/site/icorrabz/resource-center

Full details of future events can be found on the diary page 
of the magazine and on the website, or contact: ICorrABZ@gmail.com

Aberdeen Branch News

Aberdeen Branch News

The branch has now moved its activities to the Sir Ian Wood Building, Robert Gordon University (RGU), which provides ‘State of the Art’ Teaching / AV Facilities, and kicked off its new session with some thoughtful insights into the complex issue of Preferential Weld Corrosion (PWC) in a presentation by Neil Gallon and Michael Young of Rosen. This meeting was also the annual joint event with TWI (The Welding Institute) North Scottish Branch.

Pre-September meeting networking at the Robert Gordon University.

Pre-September meeting networking at the Robert Gordon University.

PWC is of increasing concern to many operators, especially in relation to ageing assets. This talk helped explain what exactly PWC was, and discussed some of the many complex welding parameters / considerations and features that can lead to PWC. The talk also discussed procedures for diagnosis of PWC, identification of mitigation options, and highlighted several other difficulties and issues that can arise with both of these aspects in relation to PWC management.

September speakers (L to R), Neil Gallon and Michael Young (of Rosen) with Aberdeen Branch chair Dr Yunnan Gao, and Mark Bragg, Technical Secretary 
of TWI North Scottish Branch.

September speakers (L to R), Neil Gallon and Michael Young (of Rosen) with Aberdeen Branch chair Dr Yunnan Gao, and Mark Bragg, Technical Secretary 
of TWI North Scottish Branch.

September speakers (L to R), Neil Gallon and Michael Young (of Rosen) with Aberdeen Branch chair Dr Yunnan Gao, and Mark Bragg, Technical Secretary 
of TWI North Scottish Branch.

Immediately preceding the September event, committee Member – Ms. Zahra Lotfi, Snr. Corrosion Engineer, Oceaneering International, gave a presentation to students of the School of Engineering, explaining how corrosion control is an essential part of engineering design and maintenance of every aspect of our lives – our buildings, transport, gas, oil, water industries, and emphasising how all depend for their survival on its prevention. This event was part of a series of talks to Aberdeen University and RGU University students to encourage them to take up free ICorr membership and to become more involved in the corrosion community.

The well attended September event on PWC for subsea and topsides welded systems.

The well attended September event on PWC for subsea and topsides welded systems.

The well attended September event on PWC for subsea and topsides welded systems.

Vice chair Stephen Tate followed on from these university presentations by providing assistance to the AFBE-UK Transition and Interview Programme on 13th October. AFBE-UK promotes higher achievements in education and engineering particularly among people from black and minority ethnicity backgrounds. Interested parties can seek further information at https://afbe.org.uk/about-us
In October, Chris Burke, Technical Consultant / Product Manager of Emerson – Permasense gave a presentation on “Non-intrusive wall thickness monitoring”. Permansense was originally a joint research project between BP and Imperial College, London, and is now part of Emerson, operating worldwide with currently over 20,000 sensor devices in-service.

Changes to process operations can often have a significant impact on plant integrity. For example the onset of sand production can be caused through increases in the drawdown on a well and high flowrate from bringing on new or previously shut-in wells, and which can impact on the effectiveness of chemical corrosion inhibitors. Current long-term risk-based asset integrity methodologies cannot predict these sudden operational events, meaning the increased levels of erosion or corrosion that these events can cause can often go undiscovered until the next planned inspection, and risk failing before that.
Chris spoke about optimizing plant integrity through continuous wall thickness monitoring using fully wireless ATEX rated equipment for automated UT, that can be very quickly set-up at upstream and downstream energy sites.

Chris Burke of Emerson-Permasense, explaining sensor technology.

Chris Burke of Emerson-Permasense, explaining sensor technology.

Chris Burke of Emerson-Permasense, explaining sensor technology.

This talk complemented the September one, in that the sensors are now also being installed to monitor PWC, and this will be the subject of a future technical article.
The presentation reviewed the increasing use being made by many operators of continuous / automated wall thickness monitors as a means to not only track erosion and corrosion in areas of concern, but as a means of identifying underlying process operations responsible – thereby facilitating and validating corrosion mitigation strategies online so that timely, evidence-based, integrity management decisions can be made.

Advantages of these new tools to corrosion / integrity engineers were discussed in great detail, prompting many questions from the large audience on matters relating to sensor installation methods, durability, system size, and data management.

All past Aberdeen ICorr Presentations may be found on:
https://sites.google.com/site/icorrabz/resource-center

Full details of future events can be found on the diary page of the magazine and on the website, or contact: ICorrABZ@gmail.com