Young ICorr

With the current energy and medical problems in society “Engineering the new decade” is going to be challenging. Young ICorr joined forces with early career engineers from the IMechE, ICE, IStrutE, IChemE and IET, for a one day event held at 1 Birdcage Walk in London, to take a closer look at how innovation and collaboration across the engineering industry will help solve some of the key challenges. CHAIN 2020 included a series of engaging talks delivered by a range of experts from industry, government and engineering Institutes, each was followed by inquisitive panel discussions. A standout of the day was the interactive workshop focussing on inter-discipline collaboration and its newfound importance in winning contracts for prospective projects. Notably, all of the presentation’s subject matter could all be linked to corrosion, such as fire safety, urban building, cyber security, future energy and engineering in healthcare. The final talk of the day was set to a vote and titled “What will it take to decarburise London?” – a hot topic of the day sparking debate between all disciplines.

It was great to meet engineers working in corrosion across such a wide range of industries at the networking event at the end of the day. Young professionals were also able to find out about the industry specific training courses and local branch talks that ICorr offers, as well and the Young ICorr group.

The next Young ICorr meeting is planned for Thursday the 23rd of April at the University of Leeds, where we are honoured to have a talk from Professor Anne Neville to celebrate corrosion awareness day. Further details will be available through the LinkedIn group, https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8599206//, and we look forward to seeing you then.

As part of the Institute social media campaign, Young ICorr also has a twitter page, https://twitter.com/YIcorr

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