ICorr Coating Inspector level 2 ONLINE – including marine and offshore

ICorr Coating Inspector level 2 ONLINE – including marine and offshore

Course Overview

This comprehensive and flexible online course prepares candidates for the ICorr Coating Inspector Level 2 examination. The course is suitable for candidates globally with 24 months of coating inspection experience as a level 1 Inspector. The Coating Inspection course also includes an additional module in Marine and Offshore Coating.

No travel or accommodation expenses. Study from anywhere around the world

Fit your studying around your work and family life.

Level 2 personnel are qualified to perform and direct inspection or testing operations according to established or recognised procedures including IMO PSPC MSC.215 (82 requirements) and they have demonstrated competence to:

  • Choose the extent of inspection or testing to be used (where agreed procedures allow);
  • Choose the inspection and test methods to be used (where agreed procedures allow);
  • Set up and calibrate inspection or test equipment;
  • Perform and supervise inspection or testing tasks;
  • Interpret and evaluate results according to applicable normative documents;
  • Define the limitations of application for common test methods;
  • Understand and transform normative document requirements into practical instructions adapted to the actual working conditions;
  • Prepare written test instructions

Course details

The course consists of 40 hours of 100% flexible online content available in multiple languages.

12 months access to the ICorr level 1 course material online.

To support your online learning programme the training material includes videos, animations, voiceover and multiple choice questions

Final practical and theoretical exams are available in the classroom and online. Examination dates

one day practical workshop is available in the classroom and online to prepare students for the practical assessment.

Course fee

£1,195+vat

Course and examination enquiries

For more information including corporate package deals and availability please visit our training partner’s website at www.corrodere.com alternatively you can contact them on:

  1. +44 (0) 1252 732236
  2. info@corrodere.com

Online Classes vs Classroom Learning: Which Is Best for Corrosion Professionals?

Online Classes vs Classroom Learning: Which Is Best for Corrosion Professionals?

Tips to Help You Choose the Best Corrosion Course

Gaining corrosion-specific qualifications could help you to propel your career to the next level. However, selecting what courses will help you achieve your professional career goals can be challenging. One of the questions you’ll need to answer is, how best do I gain my next corrosion qualification – online learning vs classroom learning?

In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of online classes vs classroom learning for corrosion professionals.

Online learning vs traditional learning: what’s the difference?

Learning online and learning in the classroom sound like very different beasts, and they are.

When you learn virtually, you must manage your time effectively and be highly self-motivated. The onus is on you to compete tasks and keep the momentum of learning going.

In the classroom, you’ll have the guiding hand of the lecturer, trainer, or teacher to help and motivate you. You’ll also have others to bounce off and engage with ─ which makes for a more relaxed learning experience.

Despite these differences, there are also many similarities between corrosion training provided online and that delivered in the classroom. For example, you will benefit from the same theoretical and practical learning, and the qualification you receive will be the same and regarded equally by prospective employers and industry bodies like ICorr.

The advantages and disadvantages of classroom learning

Usually, classroom learning for corrosion professionals is provided in specialized facilities – like ICorr’s Cathodic Protection Training & Examination Centre in Telford, where training in cathodic protection is delivered by ICorr and the Corrosion Protection Association (CPA), or IMechE’s corrosion courses that are delivered in their dedicated classroom facility in Sheffield. This isn’t the only benefit, however.

Advantages of learning in a classroom include:

  • The physical contact between trainers and learners. It’s easy to ask questions and to learn from questions asked by others.
  • There can be a healthy competitive element in the classroom setting, and this can help to keep you motivated.
  • You’ll also get to forge new professional relationships with other corrosion professionals ─ a great way to extend your network.
  • Classroom learning helps to keep you disciplined in your approach.
  • Because you’re away from home and work, your focus is not disturbed either during learning hours or when you are doing your ‘homework’ in your temporary accommodation.

What’s there not to like about classroom learning? These disadvantages should be considered when making your choice of learning options:

  • You will need to pay for your travel and accommodation, as well as meals.
  • If you don’t attend a classroom session, you miss it completely.
  • The courses are usually more expensive, because there is a whole layer of infrastructure to pay for.
  • They are time-bound. You must adhere to a strict schedule, irrespective of other commitments.
  • If you are self-employed, you won’t be earning while you are learning.

The advantages and disadvantages of online learning

You can take online lessons anywhere there is internet access. In your home, your office, or even while commuting by train. Other advantages include:

  • You are not bound by time or location. There may be a specified ‘complete by’ date, but online lessons offer the flexibility to view them at anytime and anywhere.
  • You work at your own pace, without the stricter, time-bound approach of classroom learning, meaning you can fit your course in to suit the demands of your professional and personal life.
  • No loss of earnings while learning, and you save on travel time.
  • It’s more cost-effective – courses are generally cheaper, and you don’t have the added expense of accommodation and meals to consider.
  • You may have the opportunity to meet corrosion professionals online, and these could be from anywhere in the world – a great way to extend your professional network globally.

While these advantages are very tempting, you should also think about the following disadvantages of eLearning:

  • It can be challenging to stay motivated – you must be self-disciplined and have good time management skills.
  • eLearning requires you to be technologically adept, and able to use the latest communication technology ─ and what if you lose your data or connection?
  • A lack of social interaction means you don’t benefit from other students in quite the same way as you do in the classroom.

Which corrosion course is best for you? Online learning vs classroom

Once you know which qualification is best for you at any given stage in your career, and you are ready to achieve your next career goals, you’ll need to decide which training platform best suits your needs:  online learning or classroom learning. Here are a few questions that will help you make the right decision:

What’s my ability to learn?

Think about the time it will take you to complete the course. Do you have the time available to spend a few days in the classroom? If you do, do these coincide with the course dates?

You’ll also need to consider if you have the technology to take an online course and if you have the right technology available to you.

Thirdly, how is your motivation and self-discipline? When you take a class-based corrosion course, you are held to account by the course tutor and those around you. Do you perform better in this learning situation, or do you learn more effectively when left to your own devices?

Finally, can you attend the classes from a logistics point of view? Do you drive? Will train times be prohibitive? Is the distance prohibitive? Can you be away from home overnight?

What is my socialization preference?

If you are learning by traditional methods, you’ll be surrounded by like-minded individuals. Are you the type of person who thrives in this atmosphere?

Perhaps you are more introverted, and don’t care to ask questions in front of other people.

Do you want to take lunch breaks as opportunities for focused study, or could these impromptu group sessions help you embed the learning you’ve received?

We’re not all social creatures, and we don’t all learn equally well in the classroom. If this sounds like you, eLearning could be the way to go.

How much will the course cost – is it cost-effective for me?

The last question you should ask is whether attendance of class-based learning will be cost-effective. There are many things to consider here:

  • How much does the course cost?
  • Will you need to take unpaid time off work?
  • Can the cost of the course be subsidized, by your employer or other source?
  • Upon completion, what impact will this have on your earnings potential in the future?

Qualifications in corrosion engineering and corrosion sciences, and job-related corrosion specializations, are an investment in yourself and your career.

For advice on which course would be best for you, and to learn what corrosion training, course, and qualifications are available through ICorr, please email us at admin@icorr.org with the subject line ‘Interested in ICorr corrosion training’. Tell us what you would like to know, and we’ll answer your questions by return email.

Delivering a Coating Inspector Course and Internationally Recognised Coating Inspector Qualification

Delivering a Coating Inspector Course and Internationally Recognised Coating Inspector Qualification

ICorr and ABRACO Collaborate on Equivalence for Coating Inspectors

The Institute of Corrosion and ABRACO have now reached a major milestone in a collaboration that stretches back to May 2018. Coating inspectors who have qualified in Brazil as ABRACO Paint Inspector Level 1 can now take a conversion module and gain the internationally recognised coating inspector qualification as ICorr Coating Inspector Level 2.

This is a huge step in developing closer ties between ABRACO and ICorr, and a partnership that will go beyond technical recognition. It will help Brazil’s professionals to be immediately recognised as competent for coating inspector jobs on the international stage with the recognition of an international coating inspector qualification, and help ICorr and its members gain greater exposure and recognition in another of the world’s most important economies.

This is the story of how, together, we unravelled the complexity of developing this conversion model.

Synergic connection in corrosion identified

A meeting between ICorr’s Lucia Fullalove and Florentina (Flor) Melo, and Isaac Catran of ABRACO at the INTERCORR (International Corrosion Congress) in Sao Paulo in May 2018 proved to be the starting block for the ICorr-ABRACO collaboration project.

It was during this meeting that the three realised the synergies between the ICorr and ABRACO, and between the corrosion inspector courses for which both bodies are responsible. The three became excited by the idea of developing these synergies for the benefit of both organisations and their members, and presented the idea to the then President of ABRACO, Professor Paerce de Paula Lunes.

Developing partnership goals

A letter was sent from ABRACO to the then President of ICorr, Sarah Vasey, outlining the proposal and its primary goals:

  1. The promotion of ICorr in Brazil
  2. The recognition by ICorr of Paint Inspectors trained and qualified to ABRACO standards – providing a route to become internationally certified and recognised paint inspectors

A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between ABRACO and ICorr was agreed and signed by the new presidents of both organisations in 2018 (Dr Gareth Hinds of ICorr and Dr Olga Ferraz of ABRACO).

Coating inspector courses – identifying the gap

To deliver the second of these primary goals, Lucia, Flor, and Isaac set to work on developing equivalence for the certification of coating inspectors.

It became immediately clear that there was a lot of work required. For example, in Brazil, paint inspector certification is divided into two levels, whereas ICorr’s certification model is based on three levels.

Evaluating how to provide equivalence in coating inspector certification

John Fletcher of ICorr was tasked with appraising and evaluating differences between the coating qualifications, and asked to put forward proposals on how the certifications could best be aligned. By December 2019, John had completed his gap analysis. His major findings were that:

  • The ABRACO Level 1 Paint Inspector course content addressed most of the content of the ICorr Coating Inspector Levels 1 and 2
  • There was a shortfall in Health and Safety, and in the International Maritime Organisation ballast tank coating regulations

John’s proposal was for equivalence to be achieved by developing and introducing a conversion module for ABRACO’s Level 1 qualified paint inspectors to ICorr’s Level 2 certification.

Mapping standards for coating inspector training

In 2020, and armed with John Fletcher’s findings, Lucia, Flor, and Isaac carried out a mapping exercise between the relevant Brazilian and international standards.

This work was crucial to help ICorr become acquainted more fully with the differences between the two programmes, and to understand that Brazilian paint inspectors have the level of work practices that is equivalent to their international counterparts, despite working to local standards.

In Brazil, health and safety activities are conducted by a Health and Safety qualified engineer and a Safety Medical professional. Further, corrosion protection professionals in Brazil must follow technical standards that are supported in the country’s laws – even down to how paint containers are stacked in storage.

With a better understanding of these key differences, work could begin on creating the conversion model.

Creating the conversion module

Even with the differences identified, it’s no mean feat to deliver a conversion module. The module must be created, exam questions written, everything reviewed, and all translated into Portuguese for delivery in Brazil. Fortunately, ICorr had Kevin Harold to compose the conversion module and exam questions.

With the work completed and the conversion course uploaded to the IMechE Learning Management System, Brazilian paint inspectors can now take the conversion module, sit an online exam, and, if successful, have their ABRACO L1 Paint Inspector certification confirmed as ICorr L2 Coating Inspector.

Watch this space!

The collaboration between ABRACO and the Institute of Corrosion is beginning to bear fruit.

The delivery of the conversion course from ABRACO Paint Inspector Level 1 to ICorr Coating Inspector Level 2 is only the start. This demonstrates the ability of ICorr and its membership of experienced corrosion experts to collaborate and work effectively towards collective goals – even in the toughest of global environments.

Like so much else around the world, our plans have been hampered by the Covid pandemic, but we’re now on track to accelerate the ICorr/ABRACO alliance, developing areas for growth in Brazil and enabling more Brazilian corrosion professionals to become internationally recognised for their expertise.

Watch this space for more news soon. In the meantime, to learn more about the Coating Inspector Conversion Module, please contact John Fletcher by email at info@corrodere.com.

 

Cathodic Protection Training Delivered in World-Class Facilities

Cathodic Protection Training Delivered in World-Class Facilities

The Who, How, Where, and When of CP Certification Courses

In this series of blogs discussing ICorr’s Cathodic Protection Certification Courses, we have examined:

  • Establishing competence in cathodic protection
  • Choosing which course is right for you
  • Charting your career with the CP certification scheme

In this last blog, we look at the who, how, where, and when of these groundbreaking courses.

A triumvirate of experience delivers exceptional CP training

We started updating our courses so that they would align perfectly with the new ISO 1527:2017. As is often the case, the planning and execution have taken a little longer than anticipated. We certainly were not helped by the interruption caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

What we had hoped to deliver in 2020 was delayed. It’s here now, though, and courses have got off to a flying start.

For this latest phase in delivery of exceptional training in all things corrosion, we have partnered with the Corrosion Prevention Association (CPA). If you don’t know who CPA are, here’s a brief rundown – the CPA:

  • Represents consultants, contractors, and engineers working in the field of corrosion prevention [primarily in the reinforced concrete industry]
  • Acts as the leading authority and source of information on cathodic protection and other corrosion prevention techniques
  • Shares the Institute of Corrosion’s values of encouraging a better understanding of corrosion and sharing of knowledge

CPA has extensive experience in the industry, including delivering seminars, demonstration days, holding industry events, providing CPD presentations, and, of course, online and in-person training programs.

To deliver the groundbreaking CP courses, the CPA partnered with Corrosion Control Services Limited (CCSL) to provide training facilities.

Best-in-class training facilities

CCSL has established an examination and test centre in Telford, Shropshire, and it really is a state-of-the-art facility. It is here that all our CP courses are delivered.

The Gary McKenzie Training and Examination Centre is an innovative development. We had no hesitation in approving it for courses in cathodic protection in reinforced concrete, and on-land (buried) and marine metallic structures.

Officially opened in May 2021, course delegates have already experienced all it has to offer. This includes ‘real-world’ testing grounds. Yes, course attendees will work on pipes and structures in settings that replicate being in the field. If it’s raining, be prepared to get wet!

When are our cathodic protection courses held?

The Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3 courses last between two and five days. If you are taking the exam, this is a separate one-day event with exam days tagged to the end of each course.

Course dates have been announced for through to September 2022, and there will be more to come. The courses are selling fast, and some are already fully booked. You can find out available dates for your chosen course here:

At the time of publication, depending upon the course, the course cost is £575 and £1,200, with exams costing between £330 and £375. Once you have completed the course and been successful in the exam, you will need to apply to the Institute of Corrosion for appropriate certification.

To book a course, please contact CPA on 01420 471614 or send an email to admin@corrosionprevention.org.uk.

For any further information, or to enquire about membership of the Institute of Corrosion, please contact us.

 

 

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) Level 2 – Classroom

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) Level 2 – Classroom

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) Level 2 – Classroom

Why attend this course?

The changing market dynamics and a number of PFP failures on major new construction projects will dictate the need for a more rigorous fire protection coatings Inspector course in order to further improve competency in this safety critical area of our market. The Institute of Corrosion and PFPNet have collaborated to develop the first detailed training programme for inspectors and technicians, written and produced by experts in this field who have extensive, practical ‘real world’ experience.

The purpose of this course

The purpose of this NEW course is to train and examine Inspectors of epoxy intumescent Passive Fire Protection (PFP) on the inspection of common types of epoxy coatings used to protect against hydrocarbon fires on installations for both on and offshore facilities.

Special Note

It has been agreed by PDTC (ICorr) to add an experience assessment to all ICorr certifications for personnel engaged in painting and coating inspection. If certification is required, candidates must as a minimum have held ICorr Painting Inspector Level 1 or Coating Inspector Level 1 for a period of two years. It is possible to transition across from other certification schemes here. If a suitable qualification is not held, then dispensation to gain certification may be given if an individual has 5 years’ experience relating to painting or coating inspection.

Overview

This course assumes all candidates hold ICorr Painting or Coating Inspector approval (any level) and therefore have a knowledge of inspection philosophy, surface preparation, anti-corrosion coatings and how to use common inspection instruments. The course will cover the inspection of modern types of Passive Fire Protection as found on hydrocarbon installations for both on and offshore facilities. This will include structural members, decks and bulkheads and storage or process tanks and associated pipework. Mechanically fixed methods are not covered.

Course Content
  • Overview of passive fire protection
  • Development process of an epoxy PFP system
  • Factors affecting durability
  • Common defects
  • Typical equipment used by an Inspector
  • Health & Safety requirements for site working
  • Documentation to be reviewed
  • Role of the Inspector on site
  • What an Inspector monitors during PFP application
  • Inspection & Reporting
Course Details and Price

Course: £500
Examination: 
£415.00
Total:
£915 (Excl. VAT)

Course Dates

Check our 2023 course schedule here for available dates.

If a date that suits you is not available please get in touch with your availability and we will endeavour to deliver a course that fits with your busy schedule.

Book Now

Contact our Customer Service team on 0114 399 5720 or email us at ArgyllRuane@imeche.org to check availability.

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) Level 2 – Recertification & Transition

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) Level 2 – Recertification & Transition

Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) Level 2 – Recertification & Transition

Why attend this course?

The changing market dynamics and a number of PFP failures on major new construction projects will dictate the need for a more rigorous fire protection coatings Inspector course in order to further improve competency in this safety critical area of our market. The Institute of Corrosion and PFPNet have collaborated to develop the first detailed training programme for inspectors and technicians, written and produced by experts in this field who have extensive, practical ‘real world’ experience.

The purpose of this course

The purpose of this course is to recertify and transition ICorr Fireproofing Inspectors Level 2 or SSPC/AMPP Fireproofing Inspector to the new Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Epoxy) certification.

Your recertification can be completed from anywhere in the world using our online learning system.

Special Note

Fireproofing Inspectors will also be able to recertify/transition to Passive Fire Protection (PFP) Coating Inspector (Cementitious) Level 2 in the near future. A discount is available if both recertifications are undertaken within 6 months of the cementitious course being released. If an Insulation Inspector recertification is taken within 6 months of a PFP recertification a further discount is available.

Overview

The recertification course will cover the inspection of modern types of Passive Fire Protection as found on hydrocarbon installations for both on and offshore facilities. This will include structural members, decks and bulkheads and storage or process tanks and associated pipework. Mechanically fixed methods are not covered.

Course Content
  • Overview of passive fire protection
  • Development process of an epoxy PFP system
  • Factors affecting durability
  • Common defects
  • Typical equipment used by an Inspector
  • Health & Safety requirements for site working
  • Documentation to be reviewed
  • Role of the Inspector on site
  • What an Inspector monitors during PFP application
  • Inspection & Reporting
Course Details and Price

£415 (Excl. VAT). per method
£495 (Excl. VAT) if you recertify in 2 certifications together.
£595 (Excl. VAT) if you recertify in 3 certifications together.

To enquire or gain access to the ICorr Online Recertification Courses. Please contact our customer services team using the information below.

When booking, please ensure you have an up to date copy of your CV, current PFP certificate and photograph to hand.

Email Us
argyllruane@imeche.org

Call Us
+44 114 399 5720